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Henderson Settlement to Provide Medical

Transportation through Foundation Grant
 
 
Seniors schedule appointments with the help of the new non-emergency medical transportation ministry at Henderson
Settlement. Several people in an office setting.
Seniors schedule appointments with the help of the new non-emergency medical transportation ministry at Henderson Settlement.
Image by: Courtesy Tim Crawford, Henderson Settlement
Source: GBGM Mission News
The new non-emergency medical transportation ministry at Henderson
Settlement assists seniors.  A woman holding car door for another person.
The new non-emergency medical transportation ministry at Henderson Settlement assists seniors.
Image by: Courtesy Tim Crawford, Henderson Settlement
Source: GBGM Mission News

Frakes, KY, October 11, 2006—Henderson Settlement, a national mission institution of The United Methodist Church, has received a private foundation grant to provide non-emergency medical transportation for disabled persons and senior citizens in its rural area.

“I can go to the doctor now,” said one regular participant in center activities on hearing of the award.

A grant of $43,000 from the Steele-Reese Foundation covers a two year period. The program will be administered through Henderson’s Community Care Ministry and the Frakes Senior Care Center. Henderson will provide two vans for the service.

Henderson Settlement is related to the United Methodist Red Bird Missionary Conference and the denomination’s General Board of Global Ministries. More than 80 years it has served a defined region of southeastern Kentucky and northeastern Tennessee. Each year it touches the lives of some 3,000 people, 80 per cent of whom are low income. The local unemployment rate runs between 40 and 50 per cent.

Non-emergency medical transportation is an acute need because two local family practice clinics in the area have closed within the last two years, making regular visits to doctors difficult, according to Tim Crawford, executive director of Henderson Settlement. Crawford said that “this new transportation ministry will avert the onset of critical health conditions for dozens of people on limited, fixed income that cannot afford to hire private transportation for a routine doctor visit that is now thirty miles away on mountain roads.”

Henderson Settlement was established in 1925 by a Methodist pastor. It is today one of four mission institutions of the Red Bird Missionary Conference, which traces its roots to the work of a United Evangelical pastor in 1921. The conference became part of the Evangelical United Brethren denomination and in1968 of the United Methodist Church.

This is the second grant Henderson has received from the Steele-Reese Foundation, a philanthropy set up in 1955 by Eleanor Steele-Reese to assist communities in Idaho and Montana and the southern Appalachian region. The earlier grant supported Henderson’s Maternal Infant Health Outreach Worker Ministry.

Assistance to the elderly is one component of the outreach ministry of Henderson. The need for non-emergency medical transportation was identified by the Health and Handyman Connection, a ministry focused on issues in the home that can affect health.  That program was launched with the support of United Methodist Women through their Call to Prayer and Self-Denial contributions.


 
 
 

Date posted: Oct 11, 2006